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Hope for Haiti One Year Later

A year ago today, we saw horrific images coming out of Haiti. An entire city reduced to mounds of rubble. People in pain, grieving for their lost loved ones.

One year later, we have new images from Haiti – images of hope. Thanks to your support and the support of American Red Cross donors across the country, hundreds of thousands of Haitians received crucial help this year.

We’re now focused on recovery programs to restore Haiti and make the country stronger than ever.

Watch this video for on-the-ground progress reports you’re making possible there:

We have not been without our challenges in Haiti – from recent political protests to the ongoing cholera epidemic. But the Red Cross is determined to stay in Haiti and do its best to help as many Haitians as possible.

In the last year, we have trained many Haitians to become health promoters who go tent to tent in makeshift camps, to share lifesaving health and sanitation tips and supplies. We are also running cash-for-work programs that are putting Haitians back to work building transitional homes while stimulating the local economy.

Every day, Haitians and the Red Cross field teams are working together to help the country recover and rebuild.

We would not be able to continue this work without you. Thank you so much for your support.

At 1pm ET today (January 12, 2011), I’ll be speaking in more detail at the National Press Club about our progress and challenges in Haiti. CSPAN will be airing the speech. Check their schedule to find out how you can tune in.

One Response to “Hope for Haiti One Year Later”

  1. The media appears to have been grossly unfair in its coverage of the disaster response by the Red cross and other relief organisations.
    There is a huge amount of work being done under tremendously difficult conditions, but the overall impression being given out is that ‘not enough is being done’. How much this negative press will affect future donations to disaster relief, only time will tell.

    I hope that the ‘media’ understands the possible negative effects of their comments, but somehow I doubt that they care?

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