2 minute readMilitary Support

Why a Retired Army Reserve Colonel Became a Red Cross Volunteer

Clara at the Armed Forces Bowl with another Red Cross volunteer.
Clara (right) at the Armed Forces Bowl with another Red Cross volunteer.

The road to the American Red Cross for Col. Clara Moses started in 2017. As a surgical nurse, Clara was in Fort Gordon, Georgia, preparing for deployment when she received news that her husband had been involved in a near-fatal car accident in Fort Worth, Texas, and needed surgery. Clara’s Commander at the time contacted the Red Cross to help Clara travel to Texas so she could be by her husband’s side. Throughout her husband’s recovery, representatives from the Red Cross continuously checked in with the Moses family to make sure things were going well. It was through this experience that Clara’s interest in and admiration for the Red Cross blossomed.

“The Red Cross was very kind during this process and I cannot thank them enough for all of their efforts,” said Clara. “They were able to quickly arrange transportation so that I could be with my husband when he needed me.”

Retiring from the Military

Clara joined the U.S. Army Reserves as a Second Lieutenant Recovery Room /Operating Room nurse and deployed overseas several times throughout her career. She has deployed to places like Landstuhl, Germany, in 2003 at the height of Operation Enduring Freedom, and to Iraq in 2008 in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, where she served as the Officer in Charge for the surgery department in Tikrit, Iraq. She has also traveled to Haiti and South America on humanitarian missions.

Clara was the Chief Nurse of a Combat Support Hospital in Texas when she Clara decided to retire after 27 years of service in 2016.

“I immediately decided to join the Red Cross after I retired so I could help other soldiers who might be faced with a family emergency like I was.”

Serving Members of the Armed Forces

While researching different opportunities within the organization, she learned about the Red Cross Service to the Armed Forces program, which serves as a vital link of communication between members of the military and their families. She recalled her own experience with the Red Cross and knew this was the perfect fit for her.

One of the first things Clara did as a Red Cross volunteer was to sign up to work at the Red Cross Booth at the Armed Forces Bowl, where she was able to interact with military members, families and fellow veterans.

“It was such a wonderful experience to talk to veterans and current service members from all branches of the military, and I was honored to be there.”

Since 2012, the Red Cross has had a partnership with the Armed Forces Bowl in Fort Worth, Texas, enabling the organization to serve as the presenting partner of Veterans Village, the bowl game’s pre-game fan fest that features organizations dedicated to supporting military members, veterans and their families. The Bowl game partnership is one way that the Red Cross can showcase its mission to provide vital services to those who have served and continue to serve this country.

Clara speaking with a veteran at the Armed Forces Bowl.
Clara speaking with a veteran at the Armed Forces Bowl.

“I am so thankful for the Armed Forces and I was proud to wear the uniform with honor. I try my best to embody the seven Army values – Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity and Personal Courage –to all aspects of my life, including now as a Red Cross volunteer.”

Even though Clara retired from the U.S. Army Reserves, her commitment to serving others continues.

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