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Twitter Faux Pas

Last night we accidentally tweeted from our @RedCross account something that was meant to come from a personal account.  Here’s what it looked like:

We realized our honest mistake (the Tweeter was not drunk) and deleted the above Tweet. We all know that it’s impossible to really delete a tweet like this, so we acknowledged our mistake:

In the meantime we found so many of you to be sympathetic and understanding.  While we’re a 130 year old humanitarian organization, we’re also made of up human beings. Thanks for not only getting that but for turning our faux pas into something good.

You immediately embraced this mix-up and many of you have pledged donations to the Red Cross:

Huge thanks to Dogfish Head Brewery and the micro brew community for encouraging donations.

2 words of caution:

  1. You’ll want to space out giving a pint of blood and drinking a pint of beer for health reasons.
  2. Be careful of Hootsuite!

192 Responses to “Twitter Faux Pas”

  1. […] with a recorded apology Chrsler could have taken the Red Cross approach and turned the incident into a lighthearted […]

  2. […] If you ever make a mistake though, this is the way to handle it: […]

  3. […] The hallmark example of turning sour citrus into a tasty beverage comes from the American Red Cross’ “gettngslizzerd” faux-pas. […]

  4. […] The hallmark example of turning sour citrus into a tasty beverage comes from the American Red Cross’ “gettngslizzerd” faux-pas. […]

  5. […] is human, including tweets of support from @Dogfishbeer. Read about their faux pas on their blog here. Lesson: When using HootSuite (or any posting tool) schedule in advance and preview tweet before […]

  6. […] can even allow your mistake to help others. Take the Red Cross’s #gettngslizzered mistake from a little while back as a great example. The person behind their twitter account accidentally sent out this tweet to […]

  7. […] can even allow your mistake to help others. Take the Red Cross’s #gettngslizzered mistake from a little while back as a great example. The person behind their twitter account accidentally sent out this tweet to […]

  8. […] by that time, the damage was done. The Red Cross, on the other hand, responded quickly to a recent Twitter faux pas, where an employee tweeted about Dogfish Head beers on the official Red Cross account, and as a […]

  9. […] tweet went unnoticed for an hour, which was plenty time to get some unwanted attention. When the social media director got on the scene, she sent out a humorous Tweet to follow up: “We’ve deleted the rogue tweet but rest […]

  10. […] wit and humor can also help rectify snafus, as learned from the oldie-but-goodie #gettngslizzerd tweet that still has a special place in the crisis management hall of […]

  11. These things do seem to happen. It happened with me about 2 weeks ago. Boy was i embarrased.

  12. […] the Red Cross kudos from the Twitter community, and even sparked an influx of donations. Their blog explains the mistake, and thanks supporters for their increased […]

  13. […] which account you are using. This has happened to several big brands including KitchenAid, The American Red Cross and Chrysler. If you are responsible for more than one twitter account, be mindful of which account […]

  14. […] quickly, and humourously, responding to the situation and even writing a blog post about it, the Red Cross was able to turn a potential PR disaster into a blip that most wrote-off as […]

  15. […] was unforgiving over the f-bomb incident and fired its agency. American Red Cross humorously brushed off its “drunken” mishap. Motrin became one of the first casualties of Twitter, a classic case study in tone-deaf […]

  16. […] We can all learn from my favorite faux pas turned awesome PR moment—the infamous Red Cross #gettngslizzerd tweet. […]

  17. […] someone mistakenly tweeted a post meant for their personal account from American Red Cross’s twitter the Red Cross deleted the tweet and diffused the situation with […]

  18. Instead of hiding the mistake, Red Cross offers a transparent apology in a humorous tone via tweeter after its employee tweet. I think Red Cross did very well!! The existence of the social network need to communicate with each other. Therefore the “human” factor can’t be ignored. Red Cross take advantage of the impact of “human” factor, and use a sense of humor to reduce the negative impact. When people laugh it off, than they will forget it soon. Via this issue, I found the spread speed of the network is very terrible. To defuse the crisis need to race against time, confirm and react properly to the crisis as soon as possible.It is better to find ways to reduce the negative impact in a short time rather than without making any remedy or trying to hide.

  19. […] Cross when a staff member accidentally posted to the @RedCross account: You can read about the faux pas and how the Red Cross dealt (BRILLIANTLY) with the error on the American Red Cross blog. While it […]

  20. […] then led to actual donations when Dogfish Beer called on its fans to donate, chronicled by the American Red Cross on its blog, where the organization plainly recounted the error. Beth Kanter notes on her blog that this is a great example of a nonprofit handling a twitter error […]

  21. […] Head Brewery, seized the opportunity brought by the added exposure to launch its own campaign. It generated blood donations for those in need and shined the spotlight on a microbrewery that truly “got” the social in […]

  22. This gave me a chuckle. Thanks for being human and for all the good work you do.

  23. […] And, to top it all off, Dogfish Head used this opportunity to encourage donations to the Red Cross.  You can read more about it here. […]

  24. […] as soon as things were gaining momentum and Dogfish Head Brewery joined in on the fun, they wrote a blog post that was once again down-to-earth and funny while staying on The Red Cross message of being […]

  25. […] Once the Red Cross realized the mistake they acknowledged it by tweeting an explanation and writing a post on their official […]

  26. […] Red Cross followed the tweet with an explanatory blog post titled “Twitter Faux Pas” just a day later. Utilizing self-depreciating humor, the blog post states “While we’re […]

  27. […] you don’t want them to. If you screw up, honesty can be your best policy. The American Red Cross posted a blooper of a tweet in 2011 – but handled it with humor and tact in a way that actually generated increased […]

  28. […] Read how the American Red Cross handled the situation on their blog. […]

  29. […] Head Brewery, seized the opportunity brought by the added exposure tolaunch its own campaign. It generated blood donations for those in need and shined the spotlight on a microbrewery that truly “got” the social in […]

  30. […] Head Brewery, seized the opportunity ought by the added exposure to launch its own campaign. It generated blood donations for those in need and shined the spotlight on a microbrewery that truly “got” the […]

  31. […] The American Red Cross fell victim to human error with an employee accidentally tweeted a personal tweet from the brand’s account. The brand recognized the problem with a humorous response that played off the original tweet’s content. The American Red Cross also talked about the mishap open and honestly, even addressing it on its official blog. […]

  32. […] honest and human approach in dealing with the erroneous tweet. The brand even decided to write a blog post of how the entire situation progressed. The comments on the post itself exemplify the importance of not only admitting, but embracing, […]

  33. […] before you jump into any personal accounts – this includes mobile. Even two years later, this Red Cross case study still serves as a popular […]

  34. […] you haven’t, I suggest looking into the happy results of this unfortunate tweet. Soon after, Dogfish Head responded to the commentary and retweets by […]

  35. […] Red Cross also posted an apology to its blog, using the opportunity to thank those who saw the faux pas as an opportunity to donate blood, but […]

  36. […] Red Cross also posted an apology to its blog, using the opportunity to thank those who saw the faux pas as an opportunity to donate blood, but […]

  37. […] Red Cross also posted an apology to its blog, using the opportunity to thank those who saw the faux pas as an opportunity to donate blood, but […]

  38. […] this isn’t an isolated incident.  Here are some great examples from the private sector: American Red Cross Drinking Tweet Chrysler Profanity Tweet It’s really easy to make this mistake.  So what are some things […]

  39. […] this isn't an isolated incident. Last month, a Red Cross employee accidentally tweeted about a night of drinking; she didn't lose her job after the misfire. And there were plenty of similar cases before that […]

  40. […] Make sure that your employee cannot accidentally post personal messages on brand channels (Red Cross). […]

  41. […] It’s since been deleted, natch, but the best part? It resulted in a veritable flood of blood donations. Dogfish Head Brewery made a meme out of the hashtag #gettngslizzerd, asking people to donate. And donate they did: “After I drop off a pint of blood to the @RedCross, I’m replacing it with a pint of @dogfishbeer #gettngslizzerd,” tweeted @ereed812. […]

  42. I’ll be using this as an example of best practice when things go wrong in a social media training for a small NGO this week.

    Thanks for handling this so well AND being so open about the faux pax!

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