1 minute readInternational, Leadership

What Makes a Great Leader?

Investor’s Business Daily highlights the vision and leadership of Henry Dunant, the Swiss businessman that founded the global Red Cross and Red Crescent network and pushed for the first Geneva Convention more than 150 years ago. The first Nobel Prize was awarded to Dunant in 1901 in recognition of his leadership for “the supreme humanitarian achievement of the 19th century.”

So what leadership qualities did Dunant possess?

Our own Isabelle Daoust had this to say in the article:

“He was action-oriented and a problem solver,” said Isabelle Daoust, the American Red Cross manager for international humanitarian law. “He didn’t waste a minute when he saw the carnage [at the Battle of Solferino].”

Later in the article, she discusses his strong belief in his idea.

“There had been debates over what principles should be followed,” Daoust said, “and some of his fellow leaders thought Dunant was unrealistic to believe the Red Cross could be completely neutral and impartial.”

A few nations wanted the volunteers integrated into their armies. Some activists felt the new outfit should always speak out against the aggressor in any conflict.

Dunant said no. He “was steadfast and refused to compromise because he understood the power of this innovative idea,” Daoust said.

Because of his unique vision and commitment, the Red Cross now provides wartime and natural disaster relief to 250 million people annually. Read the full article at Investor’s Business Daily.

What can modern leaders learn from his example?