2 minute readHealth & Safety

The 6 Things You Never Thought to Tell House Guests

We’ve all been there. You’re visiting a friend’s home and they run out of toilet paper. Or you stay at your in-laws and want to make a hot beverage in the morning, but can’t find the coffee grinder.

No one likes feeling unprepared away from the comforts of home, especially if the situation is more serious than not being able to find the remote. Particularly when you host a play date with kids or have guests stay overnight, an extra step is often needed to prevent or prepare for emergencies.

Here are some ideas for helping to keep your guests safe and informed in your home.

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The pool rules

If your family has a pool or hot tub, make sure barriers are in place and everyone knows how to access and play in the area safely. For instance, access ladders should be removed and safety covers secured if the pool is not in use, and toys should be away from the water when you’re done playing. Make sure everyone knows to actively supervise children and keep young children within arm’s reach, and point out safety equipment to guests in case of an emergency.

You can do a self-check to see if your pool adheres to other pool safety guidelines.

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Home hazards for kids

If you are having young children over, do a quick assessment for some basic child-proofing and identify areas of concern parents should know about.

Kid can be drawn to hazards that adults don’t give a second thought about, like pet food bowls or stairs. Let parents know if any rooms or areas should be off-limits, like an unsecured bookshelf or an unlocked drawer holding breakables or batteries.

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Game plan for health emergencies

Before hosting guests, ask about any allergies your visitors may have. Alert them to any snacks or other potential allergens that could trigger a reaction. If a child is staying without a parent, make sure you have phone numbers for emergency contacts in your phone and written down.

Let guests or guardians know if you are trained in first aid or CPR, and have the Red Cross First Aid App handy for tips on dealing with emergencies until help arrives.

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The family’s fire escape plan

Make sure your guest knows two ways out of the home should a fire occur. Bonus points for printing out this grid and posting it to the fridge!

While you’re at it, make sure your smoke alarm batteries have been recently checked. Test your smoke alarms every month and replace the batteries when needed.

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The shelter plan in case of severe weather

Your guest should know where to go should a severe thunderstorm or tornado occur during the visit. Don’t have a place set yet? Use your basement or an interior room on the lowest level with no windows.

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Other safety items unique to your household

Each home and family situation is different. For instance, if your family has a pet, make sure guests know any special instructions for behaving around the pet to avoid accidents or injuries.

 

What other safety information do you share with visitors? Let us know in the comments!

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  1. I have friends in earthquake prone regions in South America. Some live in or near buildings that are poorly built. How should people in poorly built structures respond during an earthquake? Should they leave the building? Or should they get near an inside wall (if such a wall exists)? In a city of poorly built structures, where should someone go if they do leave the building? Worried about the people in South America, and impending disaster. Perhaps I could pass some of this information along to them. Thanks!

  2. Hi Michelle,

    Thanks for reaching out! If anyone is inside when an earthquake strikes, do not try to move around. People should immediately drop, cover and hold on wherever they are.

  3. Location of fire extinguishers !!!! Everyone SHOULD have one under their kitchen sink!!

  4. Excellent reminders. Every realtor should give this article to their clients.